Day 107: Bricking continues…

22 02 2013

We didn’t go past the house yesterday so we went past today after dinner and more good progress has been made on the bricking.  Looks like the ground floor should be bricked by midweek next week.

Also the temporary doors to the house have been installed.

Front view of the house

Front view of the house.

View of the portico - you can see the brick pillars holding up the balcony have started.

View of the portico – you can see the brick pillars holding up the balcony have started.

day107-8

The bricks are going up and around the front sitting room window.

Internal garage walls making good progress up to the first floor

Internal garage walls making good progress up to the first floor.

View of garage - the external walls that goes along the boundary with the neighbour has started

View of garage – the external walls that goes along the boundary with the neighbour has started

Bricking making good progress down the left hand side of the house.

Bricking making good progress down the left hand side of the house.

Bricking along the right side of the house - view from the rear.

Bricking along the right side of the house – view from the rear.

Bricking along the right side of the house - view from the front.

Bricking along the right side of the house – view from the front.

We are really loving the Mocha bricks.

C&K

Advertisements

Actions

Information

4 responses

23 02 2013
KB SIAH

Dear C&K,
Your house is looking wonderful.Please let me know what is the BLUE material that is being use to wrap around the house? We are building in Sydney and have not seen this
Thanks
KB

23 02 2013
ournolanhome

Hi KB,

Not sure of the technical name, but we just call it the weather wrap. The wrap is suppose to form a weather-resistant barrier minimising moisture intrusion and improving the house’s energy efficiency. It prevents rain from getting into the wall assembly while allowing water vapor to pass to the exterior (otherwise the frame would get mouldy). It’s kinda like a rain jacket for the house 🙂

It isn’t necessary always blue – it could be another colour.

C&K

5 03 2013
Matt McNiece

Hi,
We’re in the process to start building a Nolan with Metricon. We’re close to signing the contract. Just last weekend after looking at the Nolan on display at Selandra Rise we’re in two minds about the facade. We had chosen the Chateau facade but the Plantation is a good contender. One of the negatives (to us) is the maintenance with the Plantation in painting the wood that wraps around the entire house & in the apex. From the photos in your post above, it looks like you might take the bricks all the way to the roof and maybe you’re not having the wood panels around the house? Maybe just wood on the front?
Love to hear your thoughts as we need to make a decision quickly. We’ve asked Metricon today for some example builds so we can see the Chateau and Plantation built.

5 03 2013
ournolanhome

Hi Matt,

Not sure you if you came across our previous posts tagged with Plantation, but you will see that we will have the lightweight cladding on the first floor – on the front facade as well as the back. I believe the cladding is Scyon Linea Weatherboard. I try to confirm this with my Site Manager.

According to the website:

Scyon™ Linea™ weatherboard
What is it?
A 16mm thick horizontal weatherboard with deep shadow lines. Scyon™ Linea™ weatherboard is the weatherboard that doesn’t weather like traditional weatherboard.

Where do you use it?
In residential applications wherever a contemporary design is required, including external walls in composite construction, upper-storey and ground-level extensions, and internal feature walls.

What are the key benefits?
Design options. The 16mm thick profile creates consistent deep shadows. The range of corner finishing details – aluminium, PVC or Scyon™ Axent™ trim – means that a range of different looks can be achieved. The Linea window adaptor can be used for subtle window treatments or the Axent trim can provide a contrast. Face or concealed fixing rounds out the options.

Easy to install. Linea weatherboards are back bevelled to sit flush with the stud. Paint application is fast because the pre-primed sheets mean less paint and time is needed to achieve a high-quality finish.

Low maintenance. Linea weatherboard will maintain its integrity and general appearance significantly longer than timber. Some timber is susceptible to cracking in exterior applications, which in turn can lead to shrinking or warping. Linea weatherboard will resist shrinking, swelling and cracking * to hold paint longer than wood, and can also be painted dark as well as light colours.

Extra security. Not only does James Hardie provide a 25-year product warranty on Linea weatherboard, but Wattyl® Australia Pty Ltd has given a 15-year paint warranty on Wattyl Solagard® when used on Linea weatherboard, and Taubmans has given a 15-year paint warranty on All Weather® and Sun Proof Max® paints when used on Linea weatherboard.

Enhances energy efficiency. When Linea weatherboard is used with the right insulation (and in accordance with James Hardie’s Wall System Thermal Performance Total R-Values Technical Supplement), an R-value of up to 2.8 can be achieved for the wall.

We have driven past a few Plantation houses with this cladding that are 5 years old or so. Whilst 5 years is not long it still looks new. We like the look of the cladding and really love the Plantation look.

If you do a search on Sycon Linea on the Home One Forum (http://forum.homeone.com.au/search.php?keywords=scyon+linea), it seems to be a common product used (not just Metricon). There doesn’t seem to any major negativity on the product and I am sure builders wouldn’t use a product if it didn’t wear well.

Chris

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: